Top 100 best cities to live in the US: Livability

Rochester, Iowa City, Ann Arbor, Olympia and Charlottesville are listed as top five.

Credit: Livability.com

A US-based independent research organization has released its report on the 100 most livable places in the United States. Liveability.com collected data on more than 2,100 cities, with populations between 20,000 and 350,000, spread across more than 30 states in the US.

The criteria for the selection were broadly grouped under eight heads: amenities, demographics, economy, education, health care, housing, social and civil capital, and transportation and infrastructure.

These eight categories, too, were shortlisted after a thorough survey consisting of 2,000 American adults who were asked to enumerate factors that make a city best for living. Several factors that were considered necessary for a dream city included good schools, hospitals, airports, low crime and good climate, among others. The organization reports that all top 100 cities are A-level, considering that they have been selected from an exhaustive database of few thousand cities, and after an extensive research.

The top 10 places in the list are Rochester, Iowa City, Ann Arbor, Olympia, Charlottesville, Bellevue, Palo Alto, Madison, Overland Park and Bismarck. The complete list, along with details on each city, can be checked at Livability.com.

The organization partnered with The Initiative for Creativity and Innovation in Cities at New York University’s Schools of Professional Studies and Emsi, which collects labor market data and processes it for better understanding on education, employment and other trends. The private sector data providers included Esri, Walk Score and Great Schools.

In addition, the data for the research was collected from public-sector departments, too. These included US Census Bureau, US Department of Housing and Urban Affairs and Education, the Environment Protection Agency, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, the US Department of Agriculture, the US Department of Education and The National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

The advisory board for the program included Bridget B. Catlin, Randy Cohen, Ellen Dunham-Jones, Peter Haas, Selma Hess, Rodney Harrell, Joel Kotkin, Christopher Leinberger, Kathryn Pettit, James Rojas, Emily Talen, Jeff Speck, Kevin Stolarick and Lynn Wombold.

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