L. Subramaniam concert in Washington, DC, pays tribute to 9/11 victims

The Indian violin maestro, son Ambi enthrall Georgetown University audience with a soulful performance.

L. Subramaniam (third from left) and Ambi Subramaniam (third from right) performing at Georgetown University on September 11, 2017. Photo by Bala Chandran/AsianOcean.com

By Bala Chandran

Indian violin maestro L. Subramaniam enthralled music lovers of Washington, DC, with a soulful performance at a special concert to commemorate 9/11 and spread the message of peace. The concert, held at Georgetown University on Monday, began with a special tribute to victims of terror attacks that claimed nearly 3,000 lives.

The legendary musician set a somber mood and transformed the university’s historic Gaston Hall to an ethereal world on Monday evening. The auditorium was packed to capacity as the virtuoso, his son Ambi Subramaniam and accompanying musicians on mridangam, ghatam and tabla delighted the audience. Subramaniam’s daughter Bindu Subramaniam, a musician of her own right, was also part of the ensemble.

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The accompanists included celebrated percussionist and tabla player Tanmoy Bose on tabla and Mahesh Krishnamurthy on mridangam.

The maestro’s wife, Kavita Krishnamurty, sat among the audience.

After the tribute by his father, Ambi Subramaniam performed Raga Abhogi on violin, which clearly showed his talent, techniques and mastery of the instrument. There is no doubt that the younger Subramaniam is poised to be his dad’s successor.

Following his son’s segment, Subramaniam was back with an alluring raga and improvisation, bringing the memorable concert to a close.

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The concert was hosted by the Georgetown University’s India Initiative and the Embassy of India.

Earlier, Indian Ambassador to the United States Navtej Sarna welcomed the audience, saying that there was no “better vehicle to transmit” the “message of love, harmony and brotherhood” than music.

Speaking about the significance of the day, he said that 9/11 signifies “so many things.” He added that it denotes “the memory of all those who lost their lives to hatred and terrorism, innocent lives, all over the world.”

Sarna reminded the audience the Monday also marked another momentous day:  the 125th anniversary of Swami Vivekananda’s address to the Parliament of the World’s Religions, which was held in Chicago, from September 11 to 23, 1893.

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A traditional lighting of the lamp ceremony was performed by Subramaniam, Sarna, Acting Assistant Secretary of State for South and Central Asia Alice Wells, and Lisa Curtis, Senior Director for South and Central Asia at the National Security Council.

Sanjoy Roy, founder of Teamwork Films, served as the master of ceremonies.

Indian violin maestro L. Subramaniam lighting the ceremonial lamp during the concert at Georgetown University on September 11, 2017. Also seen are Senior Director for South and Central Asia at the National Security Council Lisa Curtis (left), Acting Assistant Secretary of State for South and Central Asia Alice Wells (second from left), and Indian Ambassador to the United States Navtej Sarna (center). Photo by Bala Chandran/AsianOcean.com